Amongt a small handful of things, coffee is a word that would make any face light up. Almost every country has their own unique way of making and serving it.There is no doubt that coffee is engraved heavily in the Turkish culture.

Any Turkish person knows that within a few minutes upon being welcomed into someones home, they are asked if they'd like their coffee Sade (no sugar) orta (a little bit of sugar) or sekerli (super sweet) Take note ladies; if he asks for his coffee to be sekerli , then he's not manly enough.

This leads me to the main topic. A strange tradition as it may appear.

Traditionally, when a couple decide they want to get married, the groom’s family visit the bride’s family to ask for her hand in marriage. This is where the bride serves everyone a normal coffee.. except for the groom that is. Instead, he gets served a coffee with salt added to it. (if this isn't a perfect indication as to how marriage will be I don't know what is ) ...just kidding!

The groom then has to drink the not so appetising salt coffee, without making a face. Both families observe (amongst having a little giggle) as the groom anxiously sips his coffee.

So why and where did this tradition come from?

Apparently it was a total mistake.We rewind back to the ottoman times.

Osman Fevzi , who was a retired colonel in the Ottoman Empire was at his pre wedding ceremony. The bride accidentally added salt to Osman's coffee, instead of sugar (honest mistake) Osman Fevzi happily drank the coffee without making a face.
The bride later noticed she had used salt instead of sugar, and felt ashamed. She then apologised to Osman Fevzi and his family.



Osman Fevzi does not accept her apology,as he didn't consider it a mistake at all. Instead, he starts bragging about how much he loves salty coffee. Then, at the end of this story, he asks her if she would be okay with making him salty coffee after their marriage. He told her that he would much rather drink salty coffee for the rest of his life than seeing his wife being ashamed.

This is a perfect tradition to set the tone for the entire marriage.
Appreciation behind the effort goes a long way.. even if it doesn't go according to plan.


https://www.thatturk.com/blogs/news/...kish-tradition